Free Owl Printables

I made some free Owl Printables that I want to share with you today. 🙂

Free Owl Worksheets Printables Lapbook - Notebook Pages

Have your kids dissected owl pellets?  This is such a great hands-on activity if your kids are studying forest animals or the skeletal system… or even if you just want to do something exciting to add into your homeschool day! This project is wonderful with any age!

My youngest daughter finished a big unit on the skeletal system and really wanted me to order some owl pellets for her so she could look for bones. We chose the jumbo owl pellets (affiliate link) and were really happy with what we got.  ED found four skulls in just one pellet!!

Owl Pellet DissectionShe wanted to know a bit more about the difference between some of the animals barn owls eat. I made these blank notebook pages for her. I also included some Montessori 3-part cards for those of you with younger kids. 🙂

There are also some Owl Lapbook – Interactive Notebook pieces that your kids might enjoy!

Free Owl LapbookThese owl notebook pages, 3-part cards, and activities are free to download!

Click here to download the Free Owl Printables and Lapbook

Owl Pellet Activity - Free Printables

If your kids are studying forest animals, here are some free forest sorting cards I made a while back. Visit this post for the

Free Forest Animal Sort Cards

ForestAnimalSortCardsAre your kids interested in studying animals? You can find out more about our 100+ page Animal Packet or the big Animal BUNDLE here:

Animal-Unit-100-pages-worksheets-feathers-fur-scales-skin-vertebrates-invertebrates-insects-spiders

Feathers Fur Scales or Skin Worksheets and Sorting Cards

Vertebrate - Invertebrate Worksheets

The 5 animal groups worksheets

Invertebrate-Groups-Activities

Herbivores Carnivores Omnivores Worksheets Activities Sorting Cardsherbivore carnivore omnivore sorting cards and sorting matAnimal-Track-ActivitiesAnimal-Track-Activity

Animal Homes and Shelters - Where do animals live worksheetsNocturnal Animal Quick Study - Opossums Raccoons Skunks BeaversClassification of Animals Activity and Worksheets - Vertebrates-InvertebratesFind out more about our Skeletal System Unit here:

Skeletal System Worksheets

Skeletal System Worksheets and Notebook Pages

See you again soon here or over at our Homeschool Den Facebook Page! Don’t forget to Subscribe to our Homeschool Den Newsletter. You might also want to check out some of our resources pages above (such as our Science, Language Arts, or History Units Resource Pages) which have links to dozens of posts.  You might want to join our free Homeschool Den Chat Facebook group.  Don’t forget to check out Our Store as well. :)

Homeschool Den Store

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SubscribeHappy Homeschooling!

~Liesl

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links in this post are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase.

The post Free Owl Printables appeared first on Homeschool Den.

101 Things To Do This Summer

Read our Latest List Here:

101 Things To Do This Summer
Sponsored by: Time4Learning

May 7, 2012
 
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Two words parents do not want to hear over the summer are “I’m bored!” The best way to tackle this head on is to have super fun summer activities ready to go! We’ve compiled our list of 101 Things into a 2018 version we know you’re going to love!

Ideas for Summer Activities

  1. Visit a drive-in theater. Movies are exciting for kids to do with their families but sometimes, Redbox gets old and the theaters are too expensive. Instead, visit your local drive-in theater and enjoy a new experience for moviegoing.

      2. Make a water blob! All you’ll need is plastic sheeting, some duct tape, and a water hose. These look like so much fun, you’ll probably retire the backyard sprinkler!

 

  1. Eat a whole lobster with your hands. A perfect idea if you live near water! Look for places nearby that offer fresh seafood.

      4. Attend an outdoor concert. Bring a blanket to lay on and enjoy yourself. If you can find an all-day concert, even better!

      5. Ask your parents if they’ll take you on a spontaneous road trip. It doesn’t have to be far but try to pick somewhere you’ve never visited. Look for the small, local restaurants you might find along the way.

      6. Play in a summer rainstorm! Enjoy the feeling of rain – especially if it’s heavy – pouring down on your skin and soak up the smells.

  2. Take a trip to your local fair and win yourself a prize. Or, win a prize for a loved one!

      8. Create squirtable chalk. You can even add a twist to it by creating color-changing squirty chalk.

      9. Spend some time learning about ocean animals and then create your own mason jar aquariums. What a perfect complement to a beach trip!
    10. Make unique art by doing squirt gun paintings. This may remind you of paintball but without the mess on you! Simply fill squirt guns with paint and have a blast – literally!

     11. With your parent’s permission, redecorate and rearrange your bedroom. You can purchase Oops paint for as little as a dollar a gallon at your local paint/hardware store.

      12. In conjunction with #11, make summer themed bandana pillows.

      13. Spend one afternoon of quality time with each individual in your family. Have a tea party with your little sister, play cards with your brother, and hang out with your dad. Enjoy spending time with those who love you.

      14. Go camping–even if it’s in your backyard! If you happen to have a trampoline, they make great sleeping surfaces.

      15. Turn into an expert. Pick a topic you’re interested in and research it online. Better yet, pick one subject per week. You’ll be impressed with all you’ve learned by the end of the summer.

      16. Make homemade ice cream…try a flavor you’ve never had before!

      17. Learn a new talent. What do you really wish you could do? Talk to your parents about it. They can help you find ways to achieve your goals.

      18. Get up at dawn and appreciate the coolness and peaceful feeling of the early morning. Compare it to the sweltering afternoon.

      19. With your family, float down a slow river on an inflatable tube. Or maybe, a not so slow river–tubing is a blast!

      20. Play badminton. It’s a fun game. Compare it to ping pong and tennis. Just because you’re good at one doesn’t mean you’re good at the others. Why is that?

      21. Learn about bats, why they are important and why they are beneficial. Did you know that a bat can eat as many as 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour? Try building a bat house.

      22. Have a pinata party. But first, make your own pinata. Or for a wet twist, make a water balloon pinata!

      23. Interview your grandparents. They’re interesting people! Find out what games they played when they were young, what their parents were like (your great-grandparents), what kind of clothes they wore, etc. If you can, record the interview. You’ll be glad you did.

      24. Attend your sibling’s game and REALLY root for him/her.

      25. Bake a cake and then decorate it. There are a number of cake decorating shows on television–watch a few and then see what you can do. Have fun with it.

      26. Learn about compound interest and start a savings account. Check out what happens when you double a penny every day for 30 Days.

      27. Do something especially nice for Father’s Day. Show your dad how much he means to you. Write him a letter expressing your love. It’s a gift he’ll keep forever.

      28. Improve your vocabulary. Play Word Dynamo and then look up and learn two new words from the dictionary every day. At the end of the summer, try Word Dynamo again and see how you’ve improved!

     29. Learn how to do the butterfly stroke. It’s the most difficult swimming stroke. You’ll certainly get a work out!

      30. Roast marshmallows and make S’mores. If you can’t roast the marshmallows over a fire, try broiler S’mores. Even the eye of a gas stove will do!

      31. Decorate your flip flops.

      32. Watch live animal cams from your local zoo–or from any zoo!

  3. Spoil your pet for a day. Give your dog a bath, play ball with him, and take him for a walk. Likewise, cuddle your cat, pet your hamster, talk to your bird, etc. Spoil your pet several times over the summer. Turn it into a habit.

      34. Lounge on a hammock. Better yet, make a hammock first!

      35. Have a neighborhood outdoor game day. Revisit 4-square; Red Rover, Red Rover; Duck, Duck, Goose; and Mother May I.

      36. Start a blog. First, look at some free blog templates and tutorials to decide how you want yours to look.

      37. Tour a college campus. There are pros and cons to touring college campuses during the summer months.

      38. Choose a day–or two–and perform random acts of kindness. See how others respond. It’s very rewarding. Browse Kindness Ideas, and share your story as well.

      39. Talk to your parents about what you’d like to learn next year in your homeschool program. Chances are, your parents are looking at curriculum now. So, now is the time to speak up!

      40. Make FUN snacks with your siblings. Some fun ideas include easy homemade applesauce, celebration flags, and homemade ice cream sandwiches.

      41. On a really hot day, go to the dollar movie theatre and enjoy the air conditioning!

      42. Learn about cotton candy. There’s not nearly as much sugar in cotton candy as you might think.

      43. Make a work of art in your driveway using multi-color chalk. Get permission first. Did you know you can draw with make wet chalk drawings? Professional artists have done some amazing chalk art!

      44. Learn how to take a good photograph. There’s more to it than pointing and clicking.

      45. Have an old fashioned weenie roast, and make your own mustard. There are over 100 recipes for mustard available!

     46. Make an easy DIY birdbath. The birds will really appreciate it!

      47. Learn jump rope tricks. Find jump rope videos on the internet to give you inspiration. It’s AMAZING what people can do with a jump rope!

      48. Do some crazy, fun science experiments (explosions, etc.) with your parent’s permission of course.

      49. Learn how to skip rocks.

      50. Blow bubble gum bubbles–gigantic, wonderful, pink bubbles. Have blowing contests with your siblings. You can even learn how to blow a double bubble!

      51. Swing on a tire swing or a rope swing. Don’t have one? That’s an easy fix!

      52. Make friendship bracelets for all of your friends–and your siblings too!

      53. Jump on a trampoline. It can be a backyard trampoline or you can jump at a trampoline fun center. Trampoline fun centers seem to be a new craze and are popping up all over the country.

  4. Run through the sprinklers–this never gets old! Or participate in the fun celebration of Slip-n-Slide! To make a large Slip-n-Slide, use plastic tarp and to go super fast, use dish soap.

      55. Make “custom” Kool-Aid by mixing flavors.

      56. Make your own beach/summer outing bag. Then fill with summer necessities–lip balm, bottled water, sunscreen, a small first aid kit, etc. Parental assistance may be necessary.

      57. Check out your local paper to discover any free-admission activities. Lots will be going on in your community and you don’t want to miss a thing.

      58. Slide down a hill on a piece of cardboard! Or, you can go ice blocking. With both, let your parents know what you’re doing.

      59. Make a new friend. Reach out to someone who has just moved into your neighborhood or to someone that doesn’t have a lot of friends. They might end up becoming your best buddy.

      60. Give your grandparents a big hug for no reason!

      61. Fly a kite! You can buy one already made or create a fun DIY kite.

      62. Learn the physics of skateboarding.

      63. Go somewhere fun with the family. A family reunion perhaps?

      64. Think about career options and find out what type of education is required. Go online and determine the demand for the field and the starting salary. Some adults do what they love regardless of the compensation, others go into a field because of the pay.

      65. Learn all about physical fitness.

      65. Have a Cannon Ball competition with your friends.

      67. Engage in an old-fashioned sack or wheelbarrow race.

      68. Volunteer!

      69. Surprise your parents by cleaning your room without being told to do so!

      70. Learn the history of where you live. The library will be a good place to start.

      71. Play hide-and-go-seek in the DARK! Turn off all the lights in the house… and play for hours. Warning–this can get a bit raucous. Parental permission required.

      72. Try a food you’ve never tasted before. Go on… take a bite!

      73. Find a mentor. Want to learn a specific skill or obtain certain knowledge? See if someone in the community can be your mentor. This can be a family member, family friend, or someone you don’t even know yet.

      74. BE a mentor.

      75. Learn how to do a roundoff.

      76. Go to the beach and build an amazing sandcastle!

      77. Turn up the music and DANCE!

      78. Understand the science behind fireworks. http://www.howstuffworks.com/fireworks.htm

      79. Learn how to hula hoop and master some fun tricks!

      80. Visit an educational and fun farm. Can’t make it to a farm? Visit a virtual farm.

      81. Recycle bottles and donate the money to a local charity.

      82. Make up bubble solution–because we don’t know anyone who doesn’t enjoy bubbles! Learn the best conditions for optimal bubble making.

      83. Summer is the perfect time to learn! Summer should be fun and with Time4Learning, it can be!

      84. If you’re a girl, bring back the Topsy-Tail! You might have to ask your mom what one is!

      85. Make paper airplanes–there are a variety available, including printable paper airplanes.

      86. Learn how to whistle with two fingers; it takes a lot of talent!

      87. Understand roller coaster physics. They aren’t as dangerous as they seem!

      88. Make up with someone. Go ahead – apologize and end the feud!

      89. Learn the science behind rainbows.

      90. Read Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene and watch the video starring Kristi McNichol and Bruce Davidson.

      91. Learn about frogs.

      92. If you’re old enough and your parents approve, get a job. Real life experience is extremely educational!

      93. Find out how hot air balloons work. Depending on where you live, you might be able to go on one or at least watch them take off. Did you know they make a bit of noise?

      94. Learn to play chess. There are a number of free sites on the Internet that will help you learn.

      95. Build a bonfire. You can make one in your backyard or at the beach if you’re headed there.

      96. Plant a fall vegetable garden. Don’t forget to add pumpkins!

      97. Make pink lemonade bars.

      98. Do something… anything you choose… to make you a better you.

      99. Barter your services. Want to ride a horse? Offer to clean out stalls in return for riding time. Want to take guitar lessons? Offer to mow the instructor’s lawn in return for lessons. Get your parent’s permission and then make sure you follow through on your end.

      100. Read the book The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter. If you can, watch the 1958 feature film adaptation produced by Walt Disney Productions and then compare the two.

      101. Last but not least… get ready for school to resume. Clean out your desk and your homeschool area. Summer is GREAT but so is the fall!

Great Summer Resource 101 Things To Do This Summer

Great Summer Resource:
101 Things To Do This Summer

Two words parents do not want to hear over the summer are “I’m bored!” The best way to tackle this head on is to have super fun summer activities ready to go! We’ve compiled our list of 101 Things into a version we know you’re going to love!

Ideas for Summer Activities

1. Visit a drive-in theater. Movies are exciting for kids to do with their families but sometimes, Redbox gets old and the theaters are too expensive. Instead, visit your local drive-in theater and enjoy a new experience for moviegoing.

 2. Make a water blob! All you’ll need is plastic sheeting, some duct tape, and a water hose. These look like so much fun, you’ll probably retire the backyard sprinkler!

3. Eat a whole lobster with your hands. A perfect idea if you live near water! Look for places nearby that offer fresh seafood.

  4. Attend an outdoor concert. Bring a blanket to lay on and enjoy yourself. If you can find an all-day concert, even better!

 5. Ask your parents if they’ll take you on a spontaneous road trip. It doesn’t have to be far but try to pick somewhere you’ve never visited. Look for the small, local restaurants you might find along the way.

  6. Play in a summer rainstorm! Enjoy the feeling of rain – especially if it’s heavy – pouring down on your skin and soak up the smells.


7.Take a trip to your local fair and win yourself a prize. Or, win a prize for a loved one!

  8. Create squirtable chalk. You can even add a twist to it by creating color-changing squirty chalk.

  9. Spend some time learning about ocean animals and then create your own mason jar aquariums. What a perfect complement to a beach trip!


10. Make unique art by doing squirt gun paintings. This may remind you of paintball but without the mess on you! Simply fill squirt guns with paint and have a blast – literally!

 11. With your parent’s permission, redecorate and rearrange your bedroom. You can purchase Oops paint for as little as a dollar a gallon at your local paint/hardware store.

  12. In conjunction with #11, make summer themed bandana pillows.

  13. Spend one afternoon of quality time with each individual in your family. Have a tea party with your little sister, play cards with your brother, and hang out with your dad. Enjoy spending time with those who love you.

  14. Go camping–even if it’s in your backyard! If you happen to have a trampoline, they make great sleeping surfaces.

  15. Turn into an expert. Pick a topic you’re interested in and research it online. Better yet, pick one subject per week. You’ll be impressed with all you’ve learned by the end of the summer.

  16. Make homemade ice cream…try a flavor you’ve never had before!

  17. Learn a new talent. What do you really wish you could do? Talk to your parents about it. They can help you find ways to achieve your goals.

  18. Get up at dawn and appreciate the coolness and peaceful feeling of the early morning. Compare it to the sweltering afternoon.

  19. With your family, float down a slow river on an inflatable tube. Or maybe, a not so slow river–tubing is a blast!

  20. Play badminton. It’s a fun game. Compare it to ping pong and tennis. Just because you’re good at one doesn’t mean you’re good at the others. Why is that?

  21. Learn about bats, why they are important and why they are beneficial. Did you know that a bat can eat as many as 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour? Try building a bat house.

  22. Have a pinata party. But first, make your own pinata. Or for a wet twist, make a water balloon pinata!

  23. Interview your grandparents. They’re interesting people! Find out what games they played when they were young, what their parents were like (your great-grandparents), what kind of clothes they wore, etc. If you can, record the interview. You’ll be glad you did.

  24. Attend your sibling’s game and REALLY root for him/her.

  25. Bake a cake and then decorate it. There are a number of cake decorating shows on television–watch a few and then see what you can do. Have fun with it.

  26. Learn about compound interest and start a savings account. Check out what happens when you double a penny every day for 30 Days.

  27. Do something especially nice for Father’s Day. Show your dad how much he means to you. Write him a letter expressing your love. It’s a gift he’ll keep forever.

  28. Improve your vocabulary. Play Word Dynamo and then look up and learn two new words from the dictionary every day. At the end of the summer, try Word Dynamo again and see how you’ve improved!

 29. Learn how to do the butterfly stroke. It’s the most difficult swimming stroke. You’ll certainly get a workout!

  30. Roast marshmallows and make S’mores. If you can’t roast the marshmallows over a fire, try broiler S’mores. Even the eye of a gas stove will do!

  31. Decorate your flip flops.

  32. Watch live animal cams from your local zoo–or from any zoo!


33. Spoil your pet for a day. Give your dog a bath, play ball with him, and take him for a walk. Likewise, cuddle your cat, pet your hamster, talk to your bird, etc. Spoil your pet several times over the summer. Turn it into a habit.

  34. Lounge on a hammock. Better yet, make a hammock first!

  35. Have a neighborhood outdoor game day. Revisit 4-square; Red Rover, Red Rover; Duck, Duck, Goose; and Mother May I.

  36. Start a blog. First, look at some free blog templates and tutorials to decide how you want yours to look.

  37. Tour a college campus. There are pros and cons to touring college campuses during the summer months.

  38. Choose a day–or two–and perform random acts of kindness. See how others respond. It’s very rewarding. Browse Kindness Ideas, and share your story as well.

  39. Talk to your parents about what you’d like to learn next year in your homeschool program. Chances are, your parents are looking at curriculum now. So, now is the time to speak up!

  40. Make FUN snacks with your siblings. Some fun ideas include easy homemade applesauce, celebration flags, and homemade ice cream sandwiches.

  41. On a really hot day, go to the dollar movie theatre and enjoy the air conditioning!

  42. Learn about cotton candy. There’s not nearly as much sugar in cotton candy as you might think.

  43. Make a work of art in your driveway using multi-color chalk. Get permission first. Did you know you can draw with make wet chalk drawings? Professional artists have done some amazing chalk art!

  44. Learn how to take a good photograph. There’s more to it than pointing and clicking.

  45. Have an old-fashioned weenie roast, and make your own mustard. There are over 100 recipes for mustard available!

 46. Make an easy DIY birdbath. The birds will really appreciate it!

  47. Learn jump rope tricks. Find jump rope videos on the internet to give you inspiration. It’s AMAZING what people can do with a jump rope!

  48. Do some crazy, fun science experiments (explosions, etc.) with your parent’s permission of course.

  49. Learn how to skip rocks.

  50. Blow bubble gum bubbles–gigantic, wonderful, pink bubbles. Have blowing contests with your siblings. You can even learn how to blow a double bubble!

  51. Swing on a tire swing or a rope swing. Don’t have one? That’s an easy fix!

  52. Make friendship bracelets for all of your friends–and your siblings too!

  53. Jump on a trampoline. It can be a backyard trampoline or you can jump at a trampoline fun center. Trampoline fun centers seem to be a new craze and are popping up all over the country.


  54. Run through the sprinklers–this never gets old! Or participate in the fun celebration of Slip-n-Slide! To make a large Slip-n-Slide, use plastic tarp and to go super fast, use dish soap.

  55. Make “custom” Kool-Aid by mixing flavors.

  56. Make your own beach/summer outing bag. Then fill with summer necessities–lip balm, bottled water, sunscreen, a small first aid kit, etc. Parental assistance may be necessary.

  57. Check out your local paper to discover any free-admission activities. Lots will be going on in your community and you don’t want to miss a thing.

  58. Slide down a hill on a piece of cardboard! Or, you can go ice blocking. With both, let your parents know what you’re doing.

  59. Make a new friend. Reach out to someone who has just moved into your neighborhood or to someone that doesn’t have a lot of friends. They might end up becoming your best buddy.

  60. Give your grandparents a big hug for no reason!

  61. Fly a kite! You can buy one already made or create a fun DIY kite.

  62. Learn the physics of skateboarding.

  63. Go somewhere fun with the family. A family reunion perhaps?

  64. Think about career options and find out what type of education is required. Go online and determine the demand for the field and the starting salary. Some adults do what they love regardless of the compensation, others go into a field because of the pay.

  65. Learn all about physical fitness.

  65. Have a Cannon Ball competition with your friends.

  67. Engage in an old-fashioned sack or wheelbarrow race.

  68. Volunteer!

  69. Surprise your parents by cleaning your room without being told to do so!

  70. Learn the history of where you live. The library will be a good place to start.

  71. Play hide-and-go-seek in the DARK! Turn off all the lights in the house… and play for hours. Warning–this can get a bit raucous. Parental permission required.

  72. Try a food you’ve never tasted before. Go on… take a bite!

  73. Find a mentor. Want to learn a specific skill or obtain certain knowledge? See if someone in the community can be your mentor. This can be a family member, family friend, or someone you don’t even know yet.

  74. BE a mentor.

  75. Learn how to do a roundoff.

  76. Go to the beach and build an amazing sandcastle!

  77. Turn up the music and DANCE!

  78. Understand the science behind fireworks. http://www.howstuffworks.com/fireworks.htm

  79. Learn how to hula hoop and master some fun tricks!

  80. Visit an educational and fun farm. Can’t make it to a farm? Visit a virtual farm.

  81. Recycle bottles and donate the money to a local charity.

  82. Make up your own bubble solution–because we don’t know anyone who doesn’t enjoy bubbles! Learn the best conditions for optimal bubble making.

  83. Summer is the perfect time to learn! Summer should be fun and with Time4Learning, it can be!

  84. If you’re a girl, bring back the Topsy-Tail! You might have to ask your mom what one is!

  85. Make paper airplanes–there is a variety available, including printable paper airplanes.

  86. Learn how to whistle with two fingers; it takes a lot of talent!

  87. Understand roller coaster physics. They aren’t as dangerous as they seem!

  88. Make up with someone. Go ahead – apologize and end the feud!

  89. Learn the science behind rainbows.

  90. Read Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene and watch the video starring Kristi McNichol and Bruce Davidson.

  91. Learn about frogs.

  92. If you’re old enough and your parents approve, get a job. Real life experience is extremely educational!

  93. Find out how hot air balloons work. Depending on where you live, you might be able to go on one or at least watch them take off. Did you know they make a bit of noise?

  94. Learn to play chess. There are a number of free sites on the Internet that will help you learn.

  95. Build a bonfire. You can make one in your backyard or at the beach if you’re headed there.

  96. Plant a fall vegetable garden. Don’t forget to add pumpkins!

  97. Make pink lemonade bars.

  98. Do something… anything you choose… to make you a better you.

  99. Barter your services. Want to ride a horse? Offer to clean out stalls in return for riding time. Want to take guitar lessons? Offer to mow the instructor’s lawn in return for lessons. Get your parent’s permission and then make sure you follow through on your end.

  100. Read the book The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter. If you can, watch the 1958 feature film adaptation produced by Walt Disney Productions and then compare the two.

  101. Last but not least… get ready for school to resume. Clean out your desk and your homeschool area. Summer is GREAT but so is the fall!

Peanut Butter Pumpkin Brownies Recipe

Create these delicious Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownies Recipe with kids, a quick and easy recipe for family fun in the kitchen this fall.

Here’s how to bake this recipe:

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links to Amazon

One thing that I love doing during the holiday is combining a favorite recipe with a flavor of the season. One example is with my Peppermint Bark Cheesecake recipe.

The other thing that’s super important to me is that there should be a fun element that the kids can get involved with or so easy they can do it themselves.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownie Recipe for easy baking recipe with kids

This Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownie recipe looks fancy but it’s super simple, your family is going to love it.

You’ll spy in the ingredients list that we’re using store bought items to make it easy for you to bake this fall with your child. You could use our healthier brownie recipe for a homemade option instead.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownies Recipe

Ingredients for making Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownies

Grab these Ingredients:

  • 1 Box Brownie Mix
  • 1 Packages of Peanut Butter Cookie Mix
  • ½ Can of 100% Pure Pumpkin 
  • ⅔ Cup Vegetable Oil 
  • ¼ Cup Water
  • ½ cup Heath Candy Topping
  • ½ Cup Reese’s Pieces
  • (eggs, water, and oil to make cookies according to package)

Plus we have a few special things for our littlest chef like this child size apron or this adorable hedgehog apron and chef hat for fall.

These are my favorite kids baking dishes and utensils to get the kids started using.

Can of Pumpkin Pure, Heath Toffee Bits and brownie batters

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

To get started for the brownie layer, combine brownie mix, pumpkin, oil and water until mixed well. 

The kids will love mixing these two together, they smells are amazing!

Mixing brownie batter with pumpkin puree

To make things easier with the kids for the peanut butter cookie layer, in a separate bowl, make the cookie mix according to the back of the package. 

A great reading activity for little ones to read directions.

Spray a 9×13” baking dish with cooking spray or line the pan with parchment paper. 

Next you will want to add brownie batter to the pan and spread evenly.

Combining Brownie pumpkin batter with peanut butter brownie batter

With your hands, press out cookie dough and lay over the brownie layer until you have used all of the cookie dough (TIP: It will create a few gaps and that is okay). 

And now the fun part with your child, have them sprinkle with Heath Candy Bar Topping and Reese’s Pieces over the top of your dessert.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownie on Counter highlighting the candy toppings in yellow, orange and brown reeses pieces

Bake for 40-45 minutes until the middle looks done or a toothpick comes out clean.  (Adult supervision needed)

Be sure to take a peek from time to time with the kids to talk about the changes that happen to food while it’s baking, it makes for a fun science lesson.

Remove from oven and let the brownies cool completely. (Adult supervision needed) Or you could go a little fancier and serve warm with some pumpkin ice cream.

GRAB our PUMPKIN ICE CREAM RECIPE

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownie held by hand

We made one batch for our family and then an extra one to cut up and send to school with the kids for a little surprise teacher gift. YUM!!

A super easy brownie recipe for you and your child to make for someone special this fall.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownies

Ingredients:

  • 1 Box Brownie Mix
  • 1 Packages of Peanut Butter Cookie Mix
  • ½ Can of 100% Pure Pumpkin 
  • ⅔ Cup Vegetable Oil 
  • ¼ Cup Water
  • ½ cup Heath Candy Topping
  • ½ Cup Reese’s Pieces
  • (eggs, water, and oil to make cookies according to package)

Directions:

Time needed: 1 hour.

Directions for Pumpkin Peanutt Butter Brownies

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

  2. For the brownie layer, combine brownie mix, pumpkin, oil and water until mixed well.

  3. For the peanut butter cookie layer, in a separate bowl, make the cookie mix according to the back of the package.

  4. Spray a 9×13” baking dish with cooking spray or line the pan with parchment paper.

  5. Add brownie batter to the pan and spread evenly.

  6. With your hands, press out cookie dough and lay over the brownie layer until you have used all of the cookie dough (It will create a few gaps and that is okay).

  7. Sprinkle with Heath Candy Bar Topping and Reese’s Pieces.

  8. Bake for 40-45 minutes until the middle looks done or a toothpick comes out clean.

  9. Remove from oven and let the brownies cool completely.

Pumpkin Peanut Butter Brownie sitting on blue plate

These were a big hit with my family and such fun for the kids to make! Share with us how your’s turn out!

Want to do more baking with your child?

Be sure to grab a copy of The Ultimate Kids’ Baking Book by Tiffany Dahle!

The post Peanut Butter Pumpkin Brownies Recipe appeared first on The Educators' Spin On It.

Gobbly Fun Turkey Craft Ideas for Kids to Make

Are you ready for some gobbly good time this Thanksgiving? We prepared suggestions for you and your kids to ensure you will have a fun time creating lovely turkey crafts to decorate your home as well as a few ideas for small gifts kids can make for their friends and family. 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links

Here are some of the supplies you will need for turkey paper crafts:

  • Light Cardstock 
  • Printer paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue Stick
  • Black pen
  • Printer

Turkey Crafts for Kids

Without further delay, take a pick for your first gobbly fun turkey project!

  1. Invite kids to make adorable little paper turkeys and turn them into finger puppets. They will enjoy using them to retell their favorite Thanksgiving stories and maybe get inspired to make their own!
  2. For many kids, it’s boring to learn all the facts connected to history and traditions. We have a solution! Print Thanksgiving turkey cookie catcher to encourage them to learn in a fun and enjoyable way!
  3. Don’t you just love items that can be used in more than one way? Pick a printable and make 3D cone turkeys to use them as party hats, place cards for Thanksgiving dinner or puppets for imaginative play!
  4. Create an adorable Turkey paper chocolate wrapper with watercolors to give to someone you’re thankful for this holiday season.
  5. For kids and adults who adore the scent and touch of a brand new book, we share this lovely turkey corner bookmark! It will make reading ever more entertaining!
  6. Pick bits and bobs and invite kids to create lovely art for Thanksgiving! We love how they can make so many differently looking and unique collage turkeys!
  7. Combine nature and recycle bin finds to make cork turkeys! Simple craft and on a cheap to make. Just pick some leaves during walk outside and a wine cork. You are good to go!
  8. Another recycled craft we suggest to make with your kids are turkey treat holders from egg cartons. Everyone has an egg carton or two laying around so put them to good use!
  9. Perfect craft for siblings or a group of younger kids in care center or a kindergarten – paper plate turkeys! Using collage technique each of these cute turkeys will let kids work on their fine motor skills with all the cutting and pasting!
  10. Handprint crafts are super easy to create and if you have a toddler or preschooler, they are a perfect solution! Help them to make prints and create handprint turkeys for Thanksgiving cards or as an art project!
  11. How about a Thanksgiving party hat? Just look how adorable it looks! We totally adore these cute turkey hats and kids will love wearing them too! Just imagine them wearing these hats around the table during Thanksgiving dinner!

If you liked these crafts, especially the paper based crafts from Maggy from Red Ted Art, you will also LOVE her new Easy Paper Projects Book. All of these crafts are designed to use the most basic materials – paper, card and stationery to make ALL the crafts in this book!

This makes crafting inexpensive, accessible and fun. Create wonderful together time as kids learn new skills and make fun crafts to keep or gift!

Get your copy today US | UK | International

The post Gobbly Fun Turkey Craft Ideas for Kids to Make appeared first on The Educators' Spin On It.

Depth and Complexity Across Disciplines

The Across Disciplines prompt asks students to note how the topic they’re studying intersects with other fields as well as with other topics within the same field.

Across

Your unit on Weather has natural connections to social studies, language arts, and math. 📚 Across Disciplines reminds us to think broadly and note that weather has an enormous impact on civilizations, poets have tried to describe the weather for centuries, and predicting the weather is an enormous mathematical problem.

Within

But note that there are also dozens of connections within science. With 📚Across Disciplines, you can also connect Weather to fuel sources (wind power? solar power?), biomes, adaptations, the electromagnetic spectrum, and measurement.

So, yes, it’s called Across Disciplines, but it’s also Within Disciplines.

Frayer Model

One of my go-to ways to teach a concept is through the Frayer Model (developed by Fredrick Frayer back in 1969 [Yet another amazing education idea from the mid-20th-century!]). I believe I first heard of this model through pal David Chung. Here are the basics:

Four Pieces

There are four pieces to the Frayer Model. When we introduce a concept to students, we will include:

  • A definition is (hopefully) self-explanatory, but it’s worth noting that a mere definition is not enough to fully grasp a concept. That’s why we have three more pieces.
  • Essential Characteristics give us specific details that refine the often vague definition.
  • Examples are (again, hopefully) self-explanatory.
  • Non-Examples are things that this term or concept do not apply to. I love non-examples!

It works for any concept, no matter the sophistication or content area. Here are three samples: “hero”, “lake”, and “prime number.” But you could use the Frayer Model to deeply understand concepts as wide-ranging as “quadratic equation” and “Shakespearean sonnet.”

Example for “Hero”

  • Definition: the chief character in a story who typically possesses courage and other noble qualities, and with whom the reader is expected to sympathize.
  • Essential Characteristics
    • Begins the story in a humble state
    • Often encounters a problem too big for them
    • Learns and grows during the journey to solve the problem
    • Meets a mentor along their journey
    • Finds friends to support them
    • Successfully solves the problem
    • Returns home as a new person
  • Examples
    • Dorothy Gale (Wizard of Oz)
    • Harry Potter (um, Harry Potter)
    • Frodo Baggins (Lord of the Rings)
    • Rey (Star Wars)
    • Marlin (Finding Nemo)
  • Non-Examples
    • The Tin Man (Wizard of Oz)
    • Dobby the House Elf (Harry Potter)
    • Gandalf (Lord of the Rings)
    • BB-8 (Star Wars)
    • Crush the Turtle (Finding Nemo)

Example for “Lake”

  • Definition: a large body of water surrounded by land
  • Essential Characteristics
    • Not part of an ocean
    • Not flowing
    • Deeper than a pond
    • Can be natural or man-made
  • Examples
    • Lake Tahoe
    • Lake Michigan
    • Great Salt Lake
    • Dead Sea
  • Non-Examples
    • Pacific Ocean
    • Amazon River
    • Hampstead Ponds
    • Nantucket Sound

Example for “Prime Number”

  • Definition: a natural number greater than 1 that cannot be formed by multiplying two smaller natural numbers1
  • Essential Characteristics
    • Only factors are itself and one
    • Must be whole
    • Must be positive
    • Always odd, other than 2
  • Examples
    • 3
    • 19
    • 41
    • 2
  • Non-Examples
    • 8
    • -3
    • 10.3

Wrap Up

Compare a complete Frayer Model to a mere definition and I’m sure you’ll see how powerful it is to offer essential characteristics, examples, and non-examples. Oh, and here’s a commonly used graphic organizer to represent the Frayer Model (PDF).

How To Overcome Your Fear of Homeschooling

How To Overcome Your Fear of Homeschooling
Liam (age 6), mastering math
“When we decided to homeschool our oldest, one of my hesitations was math. I’d never really enjoyed it, much less taught it, but Sonlight offered so many great curriculum options that I felt we couldn’t go wrong. We landed on Horizons, and it’s been a great fit! My son looks forward to the colorful workbook pages and the manipulatives.” — Whitney N. of Raleigh, NC

If you are a new homeschool mom or thinking of homeschooling, lean in close, I want you to hear this.

You can do this! You can homeschool.

Almost weekly, I have the same conversation with moms who tell me they could never homeschool because of one reason or another. Some of the reasons they share are:

The truth of it is, I think every mom that has ventured to homeschool has had those same thoughts at some point

I remember when I first started contemplating homeschooling our oldest child, ten years ago. I was so overwhelmed and had no idea where to start. I doubted myself daily and tried to talk myself out of it on multiple occasions. But my husband was my biggest cheerleader. He helped me remember the goal we were trying to reach together as a family.

Our purpose, our family goal, became my motivation. I sought out seasoned homeschool moms, asked a thousand questions, and researched every question I could come up with. My fear began to dissipate, and my confidence grew. 

I want to share four things that helped me get over my fear of homeschooling. 

1. Identify Your Homeschool Purpose  

You must determine your goal, or your why, before you start. Write it down and put it in a place that you will see regularly because you will want to remind yourself often.

Think of it like running a marathon. When you are running mile after mile, the mile markers serve as motivators. When you see how far you’ve come and know how much further you have to go, you stay driven. It’s the same in homeschooling your children. You will need those mile markers (your goals) continuously in front of you to keep you focused, making quitting less appealing. 

Goal-setting can be a bit scary when you sit down to a blank sheet of paper, so I suggest that you check out Sonlight’s goals to get you started. Sonlight also has a guide called How to Set Great Goals for Your Homeschool that you and your spouse can work through if you need a little more guidance. 

Refuel Your Homeschool

2. Let Your Purpose Guide Your Curriculum Selection

When you start with a strong purpose and goals, selecting curriculum will be much easier. Reflecting on your family’s preferred learning style will also help you beautifully connect your purpose and curriculum. Selecting a curriculum that meets your family’s needs and what you are passionate about is the key to replacing fear with enthusiasm.  

When I was searching for curriculum, I always found myself drawn to Sonlight. It fit our family more than any other curriculum:

  • the literature-rich learning
  • the all-inclusive setup
  • the pre-planned Instructor’s Guides
  • the mission mindset

Sonlight got me excited because it looked like so much fun to teach.

Another thing I liked about Sonlight was the transparent description of the curriculum. I felt like I wasn’t being sold something, but that Sonlight truly had my family’s best interest in mind.

Curriculum Checklist

There are so many curriculum options today—new ones all the time!To conquer your fear of choosing a curriculum, focus on the ones that are transparent up front, and let you know why you should or should not buy. If you use a curriculum that matches your goals and needs, you will find you can homeschool without fear.

3. Find Your Tribe of Homeschoolers

Once your goals and curriculum are in place, you can focus on other areas that strike fear in your heart. Tell fear goodbye by surrounding yourself with like-minded homeschool moms, either in person or online. Find people you can share your frustrations with.  If you are struggling in an area, find someone who is gifted in that area to give you ideas.

If you struggle with time management, read how others juggle homeschooling and a family. If it’s fear of not having the patience to teach each child, find a Sonlight Connection Group and talk to other moms about how you are feeling. (I promise you are not alone.) There are so many resources out there to help you on so many topics—a huge arsenal to combat fear. 

Sonlight Connections Facebook group

4. Make Scripture and Prayer Your Foundation

Lastly and most importantly, staying rooted in Scripture and prayer is essential. This spiritual foundation is what holds everything together. Just when I think I’ve put all the puzzle pieces in the right spots, I realize I can’t hold it all together in my strength. I have to depend on God’s strength for that. He can take away our fear when we ask Him. 

What’s holding you back? You can do it, mama! Face your fears and show your kids how strong you are. 

The post How To Overcome Your Fear of Homeschooling appeared first on Sonlight Homeschooling Blog.

12 Days of Christmas Giveaways amp Gift Guide Sales

Christmas Giveaways and Gift Guide

Here’s a bit of a refresher on your Christmas facts. The Twelve Days of Christmas run from Christmas Day to the Epiphany on January 6. Epiphany commemorates the Wise Men’s visit to the baby Jesus.

Whether you celebrate The Twelve Days of Christmas in the Christian tradition, you surely know the classic song with the same name. Who doesn’t love belting out “FIVE GOLDEN RINGS” in the middle of recounting all the lavish gifts that my true love proffers day by day? It’s fun!

But if the gifts were real, do you know how much it would cost in dollars today?

Each year, PNC estimates the cost of True Love’s generosity and puts a price tag on all of the gifts included in the carol. They call this figure the PNC Christmas Price Index®. It currently stands at a whopping $39,094.93!

Wow! That’s staggering! (And quite a fun Christmas math activity to enjoy with your kids.)

Sonlight’s 12 Days of Giveaways

It’s back!!! 12 days, 12 giveaways, 12 surprise sales.

Sonlight’s 12 Days of Giveaways aren’t held on the official 12 Days of Christmas. Instead, we are placing them when you most need them—during Advent, the four weeks prior to Christmas. This is the time when you are hunting the best gifts for the beloved children in your life: your own children, neighbors, nieces, nephews, and grandchildren.

Meaningful and Inspirational Gifts

And we’re here to help with carefully chosen books, games, kits, puzzles, and crafts. These are gifts that will still be cherished and enjoyed weeks and months after Christmas. Gifts that stimulate the mind, inspire creativity, and foster family closeness.

12 Days of Christmas Giveaways with GIFT GUIDE

A new prize will be awarded daily—over $1,000 in giveaways! Head to sonlight.com/christmas each day Nov. 20 to Dec. 1 where the day’s giveaway will be revealed. Enter to win and then shop the deeply discounted pricing available for one day only.

Don’t be afraid to buy! If you shop the deal and also win the giveaway, we’ll refund your purchase!

The post 12 Days of Christmas Giveaways & Gift Guide Sales appeared first on Sonlight Homeschooling Blog.